Supporting English Learning

What if my child does not speak good English?
We offer courses for pupils with varying levels of English. When you come to look at the school your child will be given a short English placement test to give us an idea of his/her level of English.

If we find that there is a need for considerable English teaching, we will suggest the Intensive English Course.

If we think that your child has enough English to cope with mainstream classes, but that he/she could do with some extra English teaching to assist this integration, we will suggest EAL (English as an Additional Language) lessons.

If you have any additional questions or would like to know more about this programme please contact: registrar@britishschool.fr.

Intensive English (IE)

If my child follows the Intensive English Course, does that mean that he/she will not be in the normal mainstream classes?
No. The Intensive English Course takes up just over half the lessons in a week. For the rest of the time the pupils are in mainstream classes with the rest of their year group.
Which mainstream classes do they attend?
The IE pupils attend Maths, Art, ICT, French, Technology, PE and Sports mainstream classes with their peers.  They also attend PSHE (Personal Social and Health Education) lessons with their tutor group.
Which mainstream classes do they miss?
IE students do not attend English, History, Geography or Science, although aspects of these subjects are taught within IE lessons.
Do the IE pupils miss these subjects for the whole IE year?
We teach a modified version of the Geography syllabus in IE classes for two hours a week. The pupils may be able to go into some mainstream Science classes at the beginning of the Spring Term if they have made sufficient progress in English to be able to follow the lessons.
How do you divide your time in the IE lessons?
In IE English we teach English Grammar using a course book with supplementary exercises, audio and online material.  Pupils work through a large selection of graded readers as their reading improves and they study various set texts.  We also teach literacy and the pupils prepare passages for dictation.  Pupils regularly give presentations on a variety of subjects including their IE Geography.  Within one of these subject areas, students are expected to complete at least one piece of extended writing a week.
Do IE students receive homework?
IE students receive the same amount of homework as mainstream pupils.  An IE homework timetable replaces the homework from the mainstream lessons they do not attend and should take the same amount of time as the mainstream homework. IE students are also expected to complete the homework received in the mainstream lessons they do attend at the same rate and level as their peers, although IE teachers can be on hand to support with this.
Are all these English lessons taught by one teacher?
No. The IE classes are taught by the whole EAL Department consisting of the Head of EAL, an English and EAL teacher, an MFL teacher and a geography teacher.
When can you follow Intensive English?
There are IE classes in Years 7, 8 and 9.
How many pupils make up an IE class?
No more than 6 pupils can make up an IE class in a year as the pupil/teacher ratio is extremely favourable to the pupils learning English as rapidly as possible.
What if my child learns English exceptionally quickly?
An exceptional IE pupil may join other mainstream classes such as Science if recommended to do so by the IE and  mainstream teachers.
What resources do you have for IE teaching?
IE is taught in two dedicated classrooms with Interactive Whiteboards. The classrooms are well-resourced, having a stock of books, readers with audio CDs, a selection of DVDs, games and other appropriate EAL resources.
How can I assess my child’s progress in IE?
IE offers a progress report in addition to the whole school assessments.  For every assessment period, IE pupils’ four skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing are assessed using the National Curriculum Levels for EAL.  They are also given a grade for effort for each of these skills.  Written targets are also provided so that IE parents can have a detailed up to date progress report.  These are also discussed with students and regularly referred to in teaching.

English as an Additional Language (EAL)

Which pupils follow the EAL Course?
These classes are designed to help the pupils who do not have English as their mother tongue and who have not been educated in English speaking schools to improve their English and support the pupils’ achievements across the board.
Key Stage 3 EAL (Years 7, 8 and 9) 
How do EAL classes fit in to the curriculum in Key Stage 3 (Years 7, 8 and 9)?
EAL pupils receive one and a half hours of extra English tuition in Key Stage 3.  This work is designed to improve their understanding of English grammar and literacy.  Their English vocabulary increases and the pupils have the opportunity to speak English in a small group. We also focus on developing key reading and writing skills so that pupils can better access the curriculum across the school.
What subjects do they miss in order to do EAL?
The priority for EAL pupils is to concentrate upon improving their English and it is for this reason that they do not start studying Spanish or German.  Don’t forget that the pupils are learning French at the same time as improving their English.  However, if the pupil’s English improves rapidly, he/she can start studying another foreign language.
How big are EAL classes?
There are usually between 2 and 5 pupils in each Key Stage 3 EAL class.
Key Stage 4 EAL (Years 10 and 11) 
How do EAL classes fit in to the curriculum in Key Stage 4 (Years 10 and 11)?
If the pupil needs extra English tuition in Key Stage 4 we recommend the EAL Option.  For two and a half hours pupils receive English tuition aimed at developing their key skills in reading, writing, speaking and listening to help them access their lessons and improve their performance in all their classes.
Is there a special English examination at the end of Key Stage 4?
The English tuition over the two year Key Stage 4 period is designed to help the pupils throughout the curriculum but we also prepare the pupils following the EAL Option to sit the Edexel English as a Second Language IGCSE at the end of Year 11.  In this way they have the possibility of achieving an extra qualification.
How big are EAL classes in Key Stage 4?
There are usually between 3 and 6 pupils in each Key Stage 4 EAL class.
Key Stage 5 EAL (Years 12 and 13) 
How do EAL classes fit in to the curriculum in Key Stage 5 (Years 12 and 13)?
Extra English tuition is available to students if it is felt necessary to help support them through their KS5 studies. The number of hours will depend on the subject choices made in Years 12 and 13. This work is designed to improve their understanding of English grammar and literacy. Their English vocabulary increases and the pupils have the opportunity to speak English in a small group. We also focus on developing key reading and writing skills so that pupils can better access the curriculum across the school.
How big are EAL classes in Key Stage 5?
It is dependent on the number of students requiring extra support but it can be from one on one to up to 6.